Plain Text

I stumbled upon this bundle papers with a lot plain text today while cleaning up. I sat down, gave up all the cleaning for sometime and read through these papers. These were printouts of everything I had written using 750 words during my Entrepreneurial Design course. I know it’s all stored in the cloud somewhere, but I want to hold on to these printed copies as a reminder to tell me how important it is to write. As I read through them, I go about highlighting some gems of ideas, thoughts, and insights I had at that time. Some amazing day to day stories I had written down about work, projects, people at school and life in general. Reading through all this inspired me so much that I decided to just open the blank canvas on 750 words and start writing again.

A map

A map is a social document. It is the representation of knowledge, an archival device, a concordance of the world and its image. It is a dream, an idea, an action and an emblem of human behavior. It instigates adventures. It encompasses the entirety of what is beheld. It is the result of a holistic perception, of the fact that our eyes are constantly traveling. It is an act of conscious remembering, for there can be no remembering without previous perception that is tied to places and landscapes.

via Cartographia

After 3 weeks without cell service, I’ve realized how many times I impulsively check Facebook/Instagram/Twitter/Email. It’s freeing to have this distraction unavailable. Attention is a scarce resource and it’s a shame to mindlessly waste it on impulsive tendencies. Technology is amazing, and the benefits far outweigh the cons, but I’m practicing living in the moment instead of through my phone.

Seth’s view on an Elevator Pitch

No one ever bought anything on an elevator

If your elevator pitch is a hyper-compressed two-minute overview of your hopes, dreams and the thing you’ve been building for the last three years, you’re doing everyone a disservice. I’ll never be able to see the future through your eyes this quickly, and worse, if you’ve told me what I need to know to be able to easily say no, I’ll say no.

The best elevator pitch doesn’t pitch your project. It pitches the meeting about your project. The best elevator pitch is true, stunning, brief and it leaves the listener eager (no, desperate) to hear the rest of it. It’s not a practiced, polished turd of prose that pleases everyone on the board and your marketing team, it’s a little fractal of the entire story, something real.

"I quit my job as an Emmy-winning actress to do this because…" or "Our company is profitable and has grown 10% per week, every week, since July," or "The King of Spain called me last week about the new project we just launched."

Blogpost from Seth Godin.